Wendy Williams Continues to Experience Complications From Graves’ Disease

By | January 28, 2019

In 2010, Wendy Williams discussed living with Graves’ disease in an interview with Real Health. Now, it’s been announced that Williams is taking an extended break from The Wendy Williams Show because of complications from the autoimmune disorder, reports PEOPLE.

A statement posted on the daytime talk show’s official Instagram page on January 18, “As Wendy Williams Hunter previously shared, she fractured her shoulder and has been on the mend. Over the past few days, Wendy has experienced complications regarding her Graves’ disease that will require treatment.”

Graves’ disease causes hyperthyroidism, or overactive thyroid, which occurs when the thyroid gland produces too much of the hormone thyroxine, according to the Mayo Clinic.

The illness is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism and affects about 1 in 200 people. The disease is seven to eight times more common in women than men.

According to the announcement, Williams will be under the strict supervision of her physicians and will spend a significant amount of time in the hospital as part of her care. “Despite her strong desire to return, she is taking a necessary, extended break from her show to focus on her personal and physical well-being,” elaborated the social media alert.

Williams was initially scheduled to return to her show this week after recovering from a fractured shoulder in December, but the show’s producers aired repeat episodes instead.

Beginning the week of January 28, The Wendy Williams Show will produce new episodes with several guest hosts.  

This isn’t the first time the 54-year-old’s condition has affected her work. Last year, Williams revealed her condition on the program and told viewers she would be taking a three-week hiatus.

The note from her family concluded by saying, “Wendy thanks everyone in advance for their well-wishes and for respecting her and The Hunter Family’s privacy during this time.”

Click here to learn more about hyperthyroidism.  


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